Creating a Spending Plan

Creating a Spending Plan

Whether they make a lot of money or squeak by on a meager salary, most people shiver when they hear the word “budget.” Since the “B word” typically evokes such negative emotions, I prefer to call it a Spending Plan. I enjoy thinking about how I am going to spend my money much more than I enjoy contemplating how to restrict myself by living within a budget. After all, money is ultimately meant to be spent, right? Creating a spending plan is a beautiful thing because it is the only way to ensure that our money will go to the things we want most, not just to the things we want now. This is a critical distinction, because the two are often mutually exclusive. We can never have enough money to buy everything we want. Therefore, we should think of our spending plan as a friend who helps us get what we want most, not as an enemy to all happiness. If we have already allocated the proper amounts to taxes, tithing, insurance, and savings, then we are most of the way there. In fact, we do not even have to keep track of where the rest of it goes if we do not want to. The most important thing is to distinguish between fixed, totally necessary expenses (such as mortgage payments and utilities) and discretionary expenses (such as eating out and taking vacations). We must be sure we have enough to cover the fixed expenses first, and then we can spend whatever is left on the extras. In our family, as we have learned to discipline ourselves we...
What Is the Biggest Threat to Financial Security?

What Is the Biggest Threat to Financial Security?

One especially curious phenomenon deeply impacts the financial decisions we make. We are all affected by it. No one is immune to it, including myself. It is commonly known as “keeping up with the Joneses.” The Danger of Comparison We enter dangerous ground when we care more about what others think of us than we care about doing what is right for ourselves and our families. This is a slippery slope that can ruin us financially because we can never be completely satisfied that we are impressing everyone around us. We will always be able to find someone who has more and better things than we do. The sad news is that even if we spend every last penny to impress others, most of the people we are trying to impress may never even notice. Most people do not care about our image as much as we think they do. Think about it. How much time do you spend thinking about how idiotic someone is because they drive a junky old car or how awesome another person is because they live in a mansion? If you notice at all, I suspect you may give it a fleeting thought for a few seconds, and then you move on to focus on what you are trying to accomplish. No one is really paying much attention to our possessions. They are all too busy worrying about themselves. If we do have friends who make fun of us for not buying all the expensive toys they have, maybe we shouldn’t hang out with them so much. Many reckless spenders poke at frugal people...
More Money, More Stuff? Don’t Count on More Happiness

More Money, More Stuff? Don’t Count on More Happiness

By Carl Richards What is the one thing that, if you could just get your hands on it, would make you much happier? Go ahead. Get out a piece of paper and write down the first thing that pops into your head. Got it? O.K., now fess up. Who wrote something about a new car? How about a promotion? A bigger house? A raise? A yacht? But if you wrote down almost anything at all (except a wish for deeper and more long-lasting relationships), you’re probably wrong. It turns out that happiness doesn’t come from more money, more stuff or even big life events like getting a raise or landing that dream job. A study from the 1970s by Philip Brickman, Dan Coates and Ronnie Janoff-Bulman for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology even found that lottery winners took less satisfaction than nonlottery winners in everyday events, and in general, they were not any happier than those who didn’t win the lottery. If winning the lottery doesn’t bring happiness, how likely is it that a new boat will? Not long after my wife and I married, we were walking around in a Salt Lake City park, superexcited to be newlyweds and with big dreams about the future. We started talking about money. While I can’t recall the exact number, I do remember saying something like, “If I can just make X dollars, we’ll be so much happier.” It seems so shallow to think that some thing or number will make me happier. But then I realize how often I have heard others say it, too. Even more common...