More Money, More Stuff? Don’t Count on More Happiness

More Money, More Stuff? Don’t Count on More Happiness

By Carl Richards What is the one thing that, if you could just get your hands on it, would make you much happier? Go ahead. Get out a piece of paper and write down the first thing that pops into your head. Got it? O.K., now fess up. Who wrote something about a new car? How about a promotion? A bigger house? A raise? A yacht? But if you wrote down almost anything at all (except a wish for deeper and more long-lasting relationships), you’re probably wrong. It turns out that happiness doesn’t come from more money, more stuff or even big life events like getting a raise or landing that dream job. A study from the 1970s by Philip Brickman, Dan Coates and Ronnie Janoff-Bulman for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology even found that lottery winners took less satisfaction than nonlottery winners in everyday events, and in general, they were not any happier than those who didn’t win the lottery. If winning the lottery doesn’t bring happiness, how likely is it that a new boat will? Not long after my wife and I married, we were walking around in a Salt Lake City park, superexcited to be newlyweds and with big dreams about the future. We started talking about money. While I can’t recall the exact number, I do remember saying something like, “If I can just make X dollars, we’ll be so much happier.” It seems so shallow to think that some thing or number will make me happier. But then I realize how often I have heard others say it, too. Even more common...